La Fonderie de ROBERTSONVILLE
Robertsonville, Quebec

Robertsonville

Cast iron name tag as found on the side of the water hopper on engines built at the "Fonderie de Robertsonville". There is no mention of a serial number, horsepower rating or r.p.m. on these tags.
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Bisson

Prior to 1900, Mr. J. Adolphe Lambert had a foundry in Ste-Marie-de-Beauce and in 1911 he relocated his foundry in Robertsonville, Quebec as the region had many mines and the iron ore was plentiful. The new foundry burned down in 1912 and was rebuilt in 1913 along with a modern machine shop. Mr Jean Thomas Bisson, a machinist by trade, had invented a gasoline engine around 1909 and he became employed by Mr. Lambert at "La Fonderie de Robertsonville" in 1913. Soon after the foundry was rebuilt in 1913, Lambert decided to build the engine Mr. Bisson had invented, in his new foundry and machine shop in Robertsonville. It is not known what prior arrangements were made between Lambert and Bisson about these gasoline engines, but Bisson worked as a superintendent at the Robertsonville factory for more than 25 years.

The engine is sometimes referred to as the "Lambert", but in a 1916 adv. in "Le Canadien" paper, the engine was referred to as the famous gasoline engine "ROBERTSONVILLE". In this adv., it was said that the Robertsonville was built in 1-1/2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 15 horsepower sizes. Another publicity from the twenties lists the engine sizes at 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 15 and 20 horsepower.

In their better years, the company saw as many as 300 engine a year being sold but there were also many years were only a handful of "Robertsonville" were being built. Some of the early engines came with battery/coil ignition but the vaste majority of the "Robertsonville" had the well known Webster low tension Tri-Polar-Oscillator.

One feature that makes the Robertsonville so popular with the engine collectors is their "S" shaped spokes on the flywheels. Not all Robertsonville engines came with the "S" spokes. Apparently all Robertsonville engines of 5 horsepower and smaller had the straight spokes throughout the entire production. The larger Robertsonvilles also had straight spokes towards the end of production. In other words, only the early Robertsonville of over 5 horsepower have the "S" shaped spokes.

In conclusion, the fire red "Robertsonville" was designed around 1910 and were built in no great number, from 1913 to as late as 1946.

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